Mallorca 2009

Date: 29th September

Weather: Looking threatening, but pleasant sunshine

Route: From Soller to Deia along the GR221 - 8.6 miles by Satmap gps

Map: Mallorca Tramuntana Central 1:25000



We caught the bus to Soller – after studying the timetable this time – and had a leisurely drive along the coast. The road is very tortuous and quite narrow in places so we didn’t get out of second gear for a lot of the journey. But it only took ½ hr and we were soon in Soller town, stopping off at the supermarket to get some juice for today’s walk. It was a little noisy walking down the main road to get to the GR221 path, but we had a good look at some Black Vultures circling overhead, and a Red Kite flying even higher in the sky. There were big black clouds over the higher mountains at the back of Soller but although looking very threatening we didn’t get very wet, just a few spots.

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A very gloomy start – they like their bonfires over here

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Plenty of orange trees and almonds around

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A look back to Soller town – spot the big church

The initial route out of Soller wound its way through some agricultural land in a circuitous route, passing some interesting small holdings, including a cage full of pigeons – hmmm what’s on the menu tonight then. The GR221 finally starts up on the old mule track about ½ way to Port Soller, and gently zigzags up the hillside. The way is paved with limestone blocks, cobbles, which are worn smooth in places. There are good views back to Soller, nestled beneath huge hills, and the town centre church stands proud of its surrounding buildings – with a prominent and distinctive facade. The signs show a time to walk to Deia in 2hr 45 mins, but that would be a head down walk with a following wind and no stops to take in the views – we did meet a few people like that with a bus to catch, but most ambled along.

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Typical Olive grove scenery

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Looking down on Port Soller

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A terrace full of Crocus and an ancient olive tree

Once up on the higher ground the path winds through olive groves, and passes the path that leads down to the refugi de muletta and the lighthouse. The walk had a very different feel to the coastal walk, being very relaxing and easy walking along old farm tracks. Eventually the route leaves the tracks to join the road for a short section and turned right opposite a bar/hotel at the Son Bleda. Now I’m a great believer in taking refreshment when the opportunity arises, so we walked into a deserted bar that has a wonderful terrace with fantastic views. I had a nice chilled San Miguel with a slice of raspberry tart – absolutely delicious to go with the views out over Soller and the hills beyond.

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Easy walking along wide tracks

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Cala Deia in the distance

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Probably my favourite view of the trip – from the terrace at Son Bleda

Once refreshed we set off across the road up a narrow lane leading up to a dilapidated church. The ivy that was overhanging the walls was alive with honey bees and the sound they made was a huge buzz – there must have been a few hives worth of bees here. Around the corner from the church was Son Mico Can Pronom a rural guest house where you can stop for a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice – so we did. The views are delicious and far reaching.

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Puig l’Ofre emerges from the mist

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The old house at Son Mico Can Pronom

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Looking back down on the old church with Soller in the distance

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The route is through the gate

The remainder of the path meandered up and down through wooded areas in dappled sunshine – pleasant enough but not very inspiring for me. We met plenty of Germans out walking today and all seemed happy to be out – most said hello, even the head down much catch the bus variety. We came out on the main road again and the route descended below Deia, through lovely olive groves once more. From this aspect I could appreciate how fertile the valley was, and how it takes the full sun. The view up to the church in Deia is different again, perched up on the top of a conical hill, but surrounded by the backdrop of the limestone cliffs.

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Much of the path is along a path like this

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The conical hill ahead with the church on top in Deia

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Deia from the Sa Pedrossa path

Our route came down to the gorge with the torrent major, passing over some interesting limestone features – a karst landscape in miniature, with water worn mini water channels very sharp to the touch. We ignored the GR221 path here and crossed over the river to walk up the dark side of the town on the Sa Pedrossa path. There were a lot of small holdings here, and a lovely spot of sunshine, the old church glowing in the afternoon sun. That was the end of a pleasurable 5 hr walk, and surprisingly only a few raindrops to count. As we walked back through the town I stopped at what I thought was a bank machine, and nearly ended up with £100 of lotto tickets – oops.

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